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Technological Thoughts by Jerome Kehrli

Entries tagged [software]

Agile Software Development, lessons learned

by Jerome Kehrli


Posted on Wednesday Oct 19, 2016 at 02:51PM in Agile


After almost two years as Head of R&D in my current company, I believe I succeeded in bringing Agility to Software Development here by mixing what I think makes most sense out of eXtreme Programing, Scrum, Kanban, DevOps practices, Lean Startup practices, etc.
I am strong advocate of Agility at every level and all the related practices as a whole, with a clear understanding of what can be their benefits. Leveraging on the initial practices already in place to transform the development team here into a state of the art Agile team has been - and still is - one of my most important initial objectives.
I gave myself two years initially to bring this transformation to the Software Development here. After 18 months, I believe we're almost at the end of the road and its a good time to take a step back and analyze the situation, trying to clarify what we do, how we do it, and more importantly why we do it.

As a matter of fact, we are working in a full Agile way in the Software Development Team here and we are having not only quite a great success with it but also a lot of pleasure.
I want to share here our development methodology, the philosophy and concepts behind it, the practices we have put in place as well as the tools we are using in a detailed and precise way.
I hope and believe our lessons learned can benefit others.
As a sidenote, and to be perfectly honest, while we may not be 100% already there in regards to some of the things I am presenting in this article, at least we have identified the gap and we're moving forward. At the end of the day, this is what matters the most to me.

This article presents all the concepts and practices regarding Agile Software Development that we have put (or are putting) in place in my current company and gives our secrete recipe which makes us successful, with both a great productivity / short lead time on one side and great pleasure and efficiency in our every day activities on the other side.

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Hard software engineering interview questions

by Jerome Kehrli


Posted on Friday Dec 06, 2013 at 04:11PM in Computer Science


For some reasons that I'd rather keep private, I got interested in the kind of questions google, microsoft, amazon and other tech companies are asking to candidate during the recruitment process. Most of these questions are oriented towards algorithmics or mathematics. Some other are logic questions or puzzles the candidate is expected to be able to solve in a dozen of minutes in front of the interviewer.

If found various sites online providing lists of typical interview questions. Other sites are discussing topics like "the ten toughest questions asked by google" or by microsoft, etc.
Then I wondered how many of them I could answer on my own without help. The truth is that while I can answer most of these questions by myself, I still needed help for almost as much as half of them.

Anyway, I have collected my answers to a hundred of these questions below.

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About linkedin, software architects and a little disappointment

by Jerome Kehrli


Posted on Sunday Oct 30, 2011 at 07:45PM in General


I am really amazed and astonished by a few updates I've been seeing on linkedin recently.

I've been working these ten last years with incredibly gifted people. You know, the kind of guys you discuss with wondering whether you yourself will ever be as good, clever and keen as them. I really think being that good is nothing to be ashamed of so let's assume I can name these guys. The very first one I remember is Thomas Beck (Geneva, Switzerland) . I've been working two years under his supervision (he was the software architect on our project) and I have learn more about the job discussing with him than I ever did reading whatever software architecture or design related book (agile, DDD, whatever). Happily I have learn a lot more since I left him yet I'm quite sure he did even more so I believe I'm still far from reaching his level of mastering of the software architecture business.
Other people I would also mention here are Sebastien Ursini, Sebastien Marc and Thomas Caprez (Geneva and Lausanne / Switzerland). I haven't seen these folks since several years for some of them yet I can still pretty clearly remember what they taught me and there's not one single day where I don't benefit from these teachings in my job.

On the other hand, just as everybody, I really had much more often the occasion to work with terrible software engineers. I principally encountered two categories.

The first one is this kind of people that went to great engineering schools or universities and assume the time they invest in their studies is well enough and exempts them from providing any little additional effort to keep learning since they graduated. These people are fools believing they're great only because of some piece of paper assessing they have once been able to learn something. I hope all my very good french colleagues won't hate me for this but I have to say that specifically french engineers are subject to this bad tendency.
Unfortunately, life doesn't make any gift to anyone and most of them are sooner or later taught the hard way how they're wrong and start kicking their buts to actually start learning the job and make some progress.

The second category is way more dangerous. This is the kind of people that sell themselves as software architects without any real software development experience. These folks read lots of books, follow lots of software architecture blogs and assume that this exempts them from building their own experience before claiming being software architects. I'm not saying reading is not good, but I am pretty sure that it is in no way comparable to experience. Unfortunately, due to poor recruitment processes one one side, and the lack of good software engineers on the market on the other side, these guys manage to find a software architect job and end up taking software architecture decisions.

I am involved in the recruitment process in my current company (just as I was in my former companies). I take care of the technical assessment. I myself am usually a nice guy (well I think) and yet I show no mercy to candidates. I am pretty well aware that a mistake I make in this process might well lead me to work with bad engineers a few months later and this is a risk I'm not willing to take at all.
I am the guy killing those people. When I see someone coming in front of me with a resume claiming several years of experience in software architecture and not able to answer correctly the very first questions I'm asking him, it usually puts me in such a bad mood that I still keep the guy for the two hours that were planned and bury him 7 feet under ground. Hopefully the guy will work on a resume a little more humble before applying to another position (in another company, needless to say).
Just a word on "answering correctly": there is usually not only one good answer to a design problem or an architectural question, neither do I expect one. But I expect the candidate at least to build a proper conceptual model of the issue I'm presenting and to be able to outline a few solutions.

Now why am I putting all this online ?

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Funny developer tale

by Jerome Kehrli


Posted on Thursday May 06, 2010 at 11:03PM in Computer Science


I've been working a few years ago on an architectural concept for some very specific piece of software my former company had to develop. The technical challenges were huge and the field was pretty complex. In addition, the timeframe was very little and we have had to rush a lot to get it ready and prototyped in time.

In the end we screwed up ... totally. The concept was miles away from what was required and we pretty much had to start it all over. Months of work were just good enough to be thrown away with the trash.

Not used at all to such failures, I decided to take some time to understand what happened, what went wrong.

My investigations led to the following story, a pretty funny though quite common developer tale :

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